Early Cookbooks and Recipes 13 results

Reviews of and recipes from Colonial, American, and Mid-century cookbooks from my own collection. Cookbooks provide insight to how we lived and survived. 

Puffed Eggs for Dinner, Anyone?

I love this article and video about puffed eggs from Colonial Williamsburg's historic food blog. I've eaten eggs many ways for many meals, but I haven't seen eggs made this way before! Eggs weren’t just for breakfast in the 18th century. In fact, they were often a side dish to a meal, and not just relegated to the morning as in today’s modern world. More than 20 egg dishes can be found in the French Family Cook alone! Our Rare Breeds [...] Click here to view original web page at recipes...

Coffee Recipes from 1915

This group of interesting coffee recipes was published in the November 15, 1915 edition of the Daily Public Ledger in Maysville, Kentucky. We think of coffee as being that hot or iced drink that gives us the necessary kick in the morning to get moving ... or, maybe that kick to get through the mid-afternoon slump. Some might use instant coffee is cakes or cookies, but these recipes provide a far wider use of the caffeinated cup of Joe. The coffee recipes include coffee jelly, coffee mousse, ...

Brand Name Recipes: Lemon Freeze

I've recently started rifling through my recipe clippings from my mom, grandma, and JD's grandma. I have recipe boxes ... and Christmas shirt boxes full of them! Some are "back of the box" or brand name recipes while others are simply recipe clippings from newspapers and old magazines. I'm trying to archive the ones I remember from childhood ... and some unique ones as well. So, on Thursdays, in honor of the throw-back-Thursday craze, I'll feature one on Rooted in Foods. When I can date ...

Food History: 19th Century Menu from Tennessee

Can you imagine eating Graham mush for breakfast? While heritage cookbooks are a great way to understand our food history, newspapers offer both the "what we ate" along with the "how we lived" aspects of life during days gone past. This example of a 19th century menu is from The Tennessean newspaper, Tuesday, September 24, 1895, page 8.    Food History: 1985 Breakfast Grapes, graham mush, hominy fritters, chopped beef, bread, raised waffles, syrup, coffee.  Food ...

Senator Samuel Casey and his Catfish

Illinois Senator Samuel Casey is my husband's 1st cousin 5x removed ... and he liked catfish.  Senator Samuel Casey Samuel King Casey was born on June 27, 1817 in Smith County (now White County), Tennessee to Zadok Casey and Rachel King. Later that same year, the Casey family moved to what is now Jefferson County in Illinois, becoming early settlers and ultimate founders of Mt. Vernon. In 2004 a newspaper article written by local history lover and writer Ben Gelman, the ...

Immigrant Meals from the Late 1800s

I recently discovered a cookbook titled "Fifteen Cent Dinners for Families of Six", an 1877 version of a budget friendly cookbook for immigrants living in New York City. Originally published by Juliet Corson, this cookbook is now part of the American Antiquarian Society's cookbook collection.  Corson, the founder of the New York Cooking School, published the 44-page pamphlet during a time when poor immigrant families were prevalent in New York City. Many lived in squalor.  ...

Raisin Pie

If you were to ask me what my favorite pie is, I'd say raisin ... or strawberry-rhubarb ... or raisin. It's a toss-up between the two! Raisin was also my grandpa's favorite pie. I don't recall my grandma ever making it, but I certainly remember my mom baking one at least once a year so he'd have some. He loved it ... and would talk about his mom, Grandma Phoebe, making it when he was a kid. Grandpa was 14 when is mama died ... that was the early years of the Great Depression. I've ...

52 Ancestors #31: Dorothy Orr

It always seems odd to refer to grandparents as ancestors. I suppose that’s because I've been raised around them or grown to know them well in my adulthood. They’re people who have helped me become who I am in ways that “dead people” ancestors haven’t. Alas, grandparents are ancestors, so this week I’m writing about MPG’s Gram, Dorothy Orr. The last time I was at my mother-in-law’s house, she handed me Gram’s “The Good Housekeeping Cook Book” to add to my collection. ...